Malhamdale Local History Group    

 

 

 

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Sheep pens - Paul Bolland with Janet, James and Simon in 1992.

 

 

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Proud prizewinners at the 1993 show. Mr Peter Sharp is receiving a trophy from President's wife, Mrs Annie Heseltine.

 

 

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Mr Jack Wilson shows off his prize winning fruit cake.

 

 

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1998 - Heavy horses in the judging ring.

 

 

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1998 - Dry Stone Walling - Mark Bashford in the white shirt was the eventual winner.

 

 

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Mr James Hudson, President 1999 Show.

 

 

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Mr Richard Wellock at the sheep pens in 1999.

 

 

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The Champion Highlander.

 

 


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Malhamdale Show 1907 - 2002

The Nineties
     Farming is going through difficult times, the show has to diversify. The character of the Show in the nineties reflected the gradual decline in dairy farming in the dale with fewer classes and entries in the cattle sections while sheep entries increased with more classes for Swaledale and new classes for Blue Faced Leicesters and Mules which have become the more dominant breeds today. Fell racing, dry-stone walling and sheep dog trials maintained their traditional role at the show, while vintage cars, motorbikes agricultural machinery and tractors became more popular since historic vehicles first appeared at the show in 1988. Junior motocross took over in 1995 from the traditional motor cycle scramble. Working hunter and jumping classes continued to attract strong entries and the heavy horse section actually increased in popularity despite the disappearance of working horses from the farm. It is interesting to note that in 1947 the Herald's reporter commented that the horses on show were "hard at work in the hayfields a few weeks ago." Entries in the tents increased in variety and number, reflecting the wide variety of talent in the dale. The number and variety of "special attractions" also increased since the first efforts of the committee in the 70's to make the show appeal to a wider public. Stanley and Newmarket Colliery Brass Band became a traditional part of the Malhamdale Show scene. In 1990 entry to the show was 2.50 for an adult, accompanied children were free or 50p if unaccompanied by an adult. Car parking was free and a catalogue cost 50p making the cost of the day out for a family of four 5.50. By 2000 admission for adults had gone up to 5.00 but children were allowed in free and there was no charge for catalogues.

1990 - This years show was held in brilliant sunshine and attracted a large number of visitors.
     The Black Lanyards Free Fall Team, part of the 4th Battalion Parachute Regiment, proved to be very popular with spectators. Other attractions included Stanley and Newmarket Brass Band and a falconry demonstration. A historic vehicle rally (cars of yesteryear) was organised by Craven Old Wheels Society. Mr Kingsley Iball was elected Chairman. A Junior rugby competition replaced the five-a-side football. Skipton, Ribblesdale and Wharfedale each brought two teams, under 10 and under 12. Admission 2.50, accompanied children 15 and under free, unaccompanied children 50p, car parking free, catalogue 50p. Cost for a family with two children 5.50.

1991 - Malham Show had its first lady President.
     Mrs Sue Fairhurst who took over the position after the death of her father. The show had another fine day with gate money up and entries up in all classes. Special events included Black Devils Free Fall Team who did not arrive at the scheduled time. No sooner had the presentations in the ring commenced than a low flying aircraft flew over the showground discharging its load of paratroopers, causing mayhem in the judging ring as startled horses backed into the crowd. Other attractions included Stanley and Newmarket Brass Band, cars of yesteryear, a display of falconry and birds of prey. Junior rugby was repeated. Admission etc. as last year, but under 16's admitted free. Gate money was 5,875, attendance 2,350.

1992
     During the year the option arose to purchase the "Sheep Dog Trials" field. A special committee was formed to look into this and it was decided not to buy the field. The field used for car parking also came on the market but the asking price was considered too high for the Show to put in a serious bid and it was sold to a third party. The arrangement to use the field for parking remained, however. Weather the week before the show was terrible. Show day started fine but rain came later on. Show President was Mr T O Roberts, senior partner of the Dale Head Vet Centre in Settle and the guest speaker at the lunch was Dr Barry Brewster (of TV fame). Special events at the Show included Black Devils Free Fall Team, Stanley and Newmarket Brass Band, ATB demonstration, sheep clipping demonstration, cars of yesteryear and a falconry demonstration. Total entries were up on the previous year with good turnouts in all sections with the exception of beef. Admission was 3.00, under 16's free, car parking was free and catalogues were 50p each. Gate money was 6,436 and attendance 2,145. The show made a profit of 1400.

1993
     According to Arncliffe's John Sayer, guest speaker at the official lunch, Malham Show set a high standard of farming which other shows tried to emulate. 1993 Show day was fine with entries at about 1400, similar to the previous year. Special attractions included a sheep clipping demonstration, ATB demonstration, Stanley and Newmarket Brass Band, cars of yesteryear and a falconry demonstration. Junior rugby was dropped from the programme. Vintage agricultural machinery was included. Admission prices remained as previous year but gate money was down by 211. The show made a loss overall of around 500.

1994
     Bad weather meant a fall in attendance. Mr Gerald Hall of Coniston Cold was President and won the dairy championship. The Hilltop Bunk Barners trophy was introduced, to be awarded annually to the first lady home in the Senior Fell Race. Mrs N Spencer donated a painting titled "While the Village Sleeps" in memory of Mr J D Taylor, President of the 1990 show, who died this year. The painting was to be awarded annually to a local sheep class. The motor cycle scramble was dropped in favour of Groundhog racing (gokarts) with 6 or 7 demonstration vehicles and riders. Members of the public over 16 years of age could "have a go" using governed-down vehicles. The tug-of-war was also dropped. Other special attractions included Stanley and Newmarket Brass Band, ATB demonstration, cars of yesteryear, vintage agricultural machinery, sheep clipping demonstrations and a falconry demonstration. A disco and bar was held in the show marquee on Show Night, organised by the Caton family, the proceeds went to assist Damian Towler who was in Pinderfields Hospital, Wakefield. Admission and catalogues remained at 1992 prices. Gate receipts were down by 1,200, attributed mainly to bad weather. Cattle, sheep and heavy horse entries were down but working hunter and jumping did better. Vintage car entries were also up on previous years.

1995 - Craven's long hot dry summer came to an abrupt end for Malham Show.
     The Bishop of Bradford, the Rt Rev David Smith and his wife Mary visited the show for the first time and remarked "every time we go to a show it rains." The Five Show Championship was introduced for the exhibitor gaining most points in the Malham, Kilnsey, Keighley, Gargrave and Pateley Shows in the Heavy Horse section. Special attractions of the previous year were repeated. Admission and catalogues remained at 1992 prices. Gate receipts were down.

1996 - Golden Jubilee.
     Top quality entries despite a rainy day. Mr Val Caton was president and it was Harry Bolland's eightieth birthday. The show catalogue included a short questionnaire as a survey of those attending. Forms returned completed were placed in a draw for a 100 prize. Special attractions included Stanley and Newmarket Brass Band, ATB demonstration, Silsden Majorettes, a fox hounds display, side saddle riding display, vintage cars and motor cycles, vintage agricultural machinery, Katy Cropper (of One Man and His Dog fame), junior motocross, sheep clipping demonstrations, a falconry demonstration and a farrier demonstration. There was also a new craft tent including lacemaking and antique kitchen/farm equipment. A main attraction was John Clements, blacksmith, demonstrating his craft. Egg throwing was added to the children's sports. Admission prices as 1992 (3 for adults, under 16's free). Car parking was still free but the cost of a programme was increased to 1, bringing the basic cost of the day for a family of 2 adults with 2 children to 7.

1997
     After one of the driest and hottest summers in 100 years Malham Show continued its tradition of supplying a much-needed shower. Special attractions included Stanley and Newmarket Brass Band, ATB demonstration, Silsden Majorettes, Lampkin Motorbike Trials display Team, beagles, vintage cars and motor cycles, vintage agricultural machinery and tractors, junior motocross, sheep clipping demonstrations, a falconry demonstration and a farrier demonstration. Admission was increased to 5 per person, under 16's free, catalogues and car parking were free. This brought the basic cost of the day to a family of 2 adults and 2 children to 10.

1998 - A dry day after 7 years of bad weather!
     Mr Fred Smith was president and Rev Mark I'Anson made his first visit to the show and won a second prize for his cake. Special attractions included Brass Band, Lampkin Motorbike Trials Display Team, a Native American Story Teller, Pendle Forest & Craven Hunt Hounds, vintage cars and motor cycles, vintage agricultural machinery and tractors, and junior motocross. A main attraction was the Nicholas Smith Mazda Balloon Race. 5,000 balloons were released to raise funds for the 700 year old parish church of St Michael the Archangel in Kirkby Malham. Admission, car parking and catalogues at 1997 prices.

1999
     Despite the current farming crisis the Show this year attracted the highest number of cattle entries in three years. Mr James Hudson was president and Mr Chris Hall was chairman. For the first time in 9 years it was not only dry but sunny. Special attractions included Brass Band, Cheshire Dog Display Team, sheep clipping demonstration, Airedale Beagles, a falconry display, vintage cars and motor cycles, vintage agricultural machinery and tractors, and junior motocross. The Rylstone W I Calendar Girls attended.

 

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