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Kirkby Malhamdale Population

Monarchs and their Governments have always wanted to assess the population in some way or other, whether it was to check the potential to gather tax revenue, see what manpower was available for war, view the population trends or verify the skills base of the work force. Governments like their statistics and there is nothing like a survey or census to provide plenty of facts to keep the civil service number crunchers busy.
The modern census was first proposed in 1753, the act passed by Parliament in 1800 and the first official Census was instigated on 10 March 1801, however until 1841 it was purely statistical and held no personal information. The years which provide personal information are subject to a 100 year closure rule so only the years 1841-1901 are currently available. However the population statistics which allow you to see the growth/decline of a population are made publicly available soon after the census is taken, and it is these figures which are reproduced here.
There are many interesting population movements to be seen in these figures and the trends they show could well be worth investigating further. For instance the numbers of inhabitants on Malham Moor peak during the time it was owned by Walter Morrison, possibly indicating the high staffing level on his estate or its prosperity at the time. The Cotton, and later silk, mill near Coniston Cold created much employment and led to the building of Bell Busk village. You can see the large population at the start of the 19th century, mainly workers at the thriving cotton mill, this declines toward the middle of the century to a low in 1861, the time of the Cotton Famine caused by the American Civil War. After turning to silk spinning its fortunes picked up until the mill closed causing a 50% slump in the population recorded in the 1901 census. Kirkby Malham's population was swelled by workers at Scalegill cotton Mill, as was Airton's, whilst in the other townships have populations which changed little. Population figures are going up again, depite fewer people sharing a dwelling, as new houses are built and barns converted.
Population statistics are not as dull as they may seem, when looked at in the context of local history.

Township 1801 1811 1821 1831 1841 1851 1861 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911 1921 1931 1951 1961 1971 1981 1991
Malham Moor 98 97 88 94 102 92 115 124 126 118 102 123 105 99 120 122 125 78 77
Malham 262 306 262 259 233 188 184 164 148 163 140 131 142 126 171 135 165 112 134
Kirkby Malham 167 175 204 219 195 139 128 174 145 107 106 118 113 103 55 65 74 68 70
Hanlith 81 51 46 42 25 36 40 33 34 26 30 37 37 43 39 25 23 14 11
Scosthrop 90 80 102 95 48 75 64 85 67 80 66 72 60 59 56 58 57 57 78
Airton 139 176 187 179 217 225 236 244 203 212 221 201 231 216 171 140 130 150 181
Calton 98 89 76 79 79 75 56 52 59 75 54 53 63 51 109 55 142* 32 58
Otterburn 26 47 40 66 48 54 59 54 39 47 54 58 51 60 53 40 30 39 33
Coniston Cold 343 257 345 336 242 289 238 266 337 392 178 178 164 158 154 128 75 104 151
Eshton 84 63 69 82 74 84 81 60 64 76 93 88 80 70 55 50 94 97 101
Flasby with Winterburn 120 150 134 143 140 124 113 110 128 163 98 96 100 94 117 110 80 90 94
Bordley Previously included with Hetton 31 40 41 44 37 41 40 32 31 21 20 27 15

* Figure probably inflated by a large number of guests at Newfield Hall

You can find out much more information from the data in the census returns, for instance the number of dwellings occupied by the current population, the number of people sharing dwellings can be quite high and many dwellings were just a couple of rooms. A reduction in the population could leave many vacant properties, just one of the many things you can investigate using the detailed census statistics for a township.
If you want to investigate the statistics for a particualr township in more detail, then the A Vision of Britain through Time External Website logo website is a good place to start and the links below will take you direct to the relevant pages of their website.

Vision of Britain Through Time
Malham Moor External Website logo
Malham External Website logo
Kirkby Malham External Website logo
Hanlith External Website logo
Scosthrop External Website logo
Airton External Website logo
Calton External Website logo
Otterburn External Website logo
Coniston Cold External Website logo
Eshton External Website logo
Flasby with Winterburn External Website logo
Bordley External Website logo

We also have many other resources on the website which are good indications of the population, including full census transcripts for some townships; other resources may refer to the number of dwellings or eligible citizens, but they can often be usefully expanded to provide a good idea of the population of Malhamdale through the ages.

Malham, Mallam, Malum, Maulm, Mawm, Malam, Mallum, Moor, Moore, More, Kirkby, Kirby, Mallamdale, Mallumdale, Malhamdale, Malham-Dale, Kirkby-in-Malham-Dale, Kirkby-Malham-Dale, Kirby-in-Malham-Dale, Kirby-Malham-Dale, Hanlith, Hanlyth, Scosthrop, Scosthorpe, Skosthrop, Airton, Ayrton, Airtown, Calton, Carlton, Craven, Yorkshire, Otterburn, Otter Burn, Bellbusk, Bell Busk, Conistone, Family, Genealogy, Geneology, Buildings, People, Maps, Census, Scawthorpe, Scothorpe, Return to Previous Page
Cold, Coniston Cold, Bordley, Bordly, Boardly, Boardley, Winterburn, Winter Burn, History, Local, ancestors, ancestry, Scorthorp, Wills, Tax, Eshton, Asheton


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